Fritz Family Fellows Program

The Fritz Family Fellows Program is a joint effort among Georgetown’s three campuses and nine schools to harness technology for the betterment of humanity. The fellowship program aims to cultivate the next generation of leaders with expertise in the social impacts of technology, and build a network of public interest technologists who learn from and support each other’s work.

Please contact fritzfellows@georgetown.edu with any queries!


2020-2021 Fellows

Lindsey Barrett

Post-doc Fellow; Calendar Year

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Michael Kranzlein

P.h.D. Fellow; Calendar Year

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Meera Kolluri

Masters Fellow; Calendar Year

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Shuo Liu

Philosophy Ph.D. Fellow; Calendar Year

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J.J. Naddeo

P.h.D Fellow; Calendar Year

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Madeline Pfister

Undergraduate Fellow; Academic Year

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Garrett Quenneville

Post-doc Fellow; Calendar Year

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Brian Taylor

Undergraduate Fellow; Calendar Year

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Joyce Yang

Undergraduate Fellow; Calendar Year

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Past Fritz Fellows

Adam Ginsburg

Undergraduate Fritz Family Fellow

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Obinna (Obi) Iloani

Law Fritz Family Fellow

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Romina Montellano Morales

Law Fritz Family Fellow

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Lindsey Barrett

Post-doc Fellow; Calendar Year

Lindsey Barrett is a Fritz Family Fellow at the Institute for Technology Law & Policy at Georgetown Law and Communications, Culture & Technology (CCT), where she conducts research on privacy law and policy with a cross-disciplinary focus. Previously, she represented nonprofits in technology policy matters before federal agencies as a staff attorney and teaching fellow at Georgetown Law’s Communications & Technology Law Clinic. Her scholarship on consumer privacy and the Fourth Amendment has been published in a number of law journals, including the Seattle Law Review, the Georgetown Law Journal, and the Georgetown Law Technology Review, which she co-founded, while her other writing has been featured in popular publications like Slate, Fast Company, and Techdirt. She received her B.A. from Duke with honors, and both an LLM in Advocacy with distinction and her law degree from Georgetown.

Michael Kranzlein

P.h.D. Fellow; Calendar Year

Michael Kranzlein is a computer science PhD student at Georgetown University working on natural language processing and computational linguistics. His work focuses on modelling language meaning for computers and improving the performance of text-based models via calibration. As a Fritz Family Fellow, Michael is collaborating with faculty of the Department of Computer Science, the Law Center, and the Massive Data Institute on the development of automated systems for detecting relevant linguistic ambiguities in legal texts. This work is informed by his experience working on legal AI at Ernst & Young and his expertise in computational semantics and calibration.

Before Georgetown, Michael earned a master’s degree in computer science from Kennesaw State University and bachelor’s degrees in computer science and French from Belmont University.

Meera Kolluri

Masters Fellow; Calendar Year

Meera Kolluri is a former Program Assistant and current Graduate Fritz Fellow at Ethics Lab, where she conducts research and programming to support their Humane Technology Initiative. Kolluri is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in Communication, Culture and Technology at the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at Georgetown University. Her academic focus lies at the intersection of ethical design, systems of surveillance, and technology policy. Her current projects assess methods and consequences of monetizing the human body through the use of technology. Kolluri advocates intersectional justice and equity practices at the forefront of her work. She aims to create systems of accountability and accessibility to ensure just technological innovation. Through the Fritz Family Fellowship, Kolluri’s work will examine the intersections of surveillance technology, cyberlaw, and design justice in various sectors, with the goal of supplementing theories of control with theories of care. Kolluri earned a dual Bachelor of Arts degree with honors from Scripps College in Legal Studies and Politics.

Shuo Liu

Philosophy Ph.D. Fellow; Calendar Year

Shuo is a second-year PhD student at Georgetown University in computer science. His current research interest lies in the area of fault-tolerant distributed optimization algorithms and implementations, including distributed machine learning, specifically Byzantine fault-tolerant models. Prior to that, he obtained his master’s degree in computer science at Georgetown, and undergraduate degree in mathematics at Fudan University, China. His master’s thesis studied a type of possible privacy exposures of users on social media.

J.J. Naddeo

P.h.D Fellow; Calendar Year

In collaboration with the Beeck Center and the Massive Data Institute J.J. is working with the Justice Innovation Lab (JIL) to identify potential racial disparities in incarcerations in local criminal justice systems. While not working at the JIL, J.J. is working on completing his PhD in Economics at Georgetown University, and consulting at the World Bank. His research utilizes spatial data and state of the art econometric tools to answer questions focusing on political economics. Prior to moving to D.C., J.J. finished his bachelor’s degree in physics at Rutgers-University Camden in Camden, NJ. He enjoys spending his free time camping and canoeing with friends and family.

Madeline Pfister

Undergraduate Fellow; Academic Year

Madeline is a Georgetown sophomore from Williamsburg, Virginia majoring in Operations and Information Management and minoring in Statistics. She spent the summer of 2020 as a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellow studying data ethics in the credit card industry. In her free time, Madeline loves to read a good book.

As a Fritz Fellow, Madeline works with the Massive Data Institute (MDI) and PEW Charitable er goal is to understand and measure how models can be biased towards groups of people with different characteristics and figure out ways to mitigate such eventsTrust to work towards a Civil Justice Data Commons. The purpose of the Civil Justice Data Commons is to provide data to those working in civil justice and to propose a data governance model.

Garrett Quenneville

Post-doc Fellow; Calendar Year

Garrett is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Technology Law and Policy and the Massive Data Institute (MDI) working on the Civil Justice Data Commons; a project to compile data across civil justice institutions to promote research and knowledge-sharing. Previously, he worked at the American Institute for Research on the National Household Education survey as a data analyst and at the Institute for Social Science Research evaluating the Alabama Accountability Act. He has a Masters degree in Public Policy from the University of Michigan and a BA in economics from the University of Michigan.

Brian Taylor

Undergraduate Fellow; Calendar Year

Hailing from Middletown, NJ, Brian is a senior at Georgetown completing a dual major in Government and Mathematics. At Georgetown and as a data intern at the RNC, he has sought to apply statistics and data analysis to the political arena. In his capacity as a Fritz Family Fellow, Brian is working with Professor Michael Bailey to explore the relationship between political moderation and electability by analyzing candidate social media and campaign websites in conjunction with electoral results. In his free time, he enjoys running and playing the drums.

Joyce Yang

Undergraduate Fellow; Calendar Year

Joyce is a junior in the School of Foreign Service majoring in Science, Technology, and International Affairs with a minor in Computer Science. She first got involved with research on Tech Policy issues as a Mortara Undergraduate Research Fellow where she worked with Dr. Meg Leta Jones. Joyce has done research analyzing congressional hearings on Big Tech, policy and implementation surrounding contact tracing apps, and the history of Silicon Valley. Outside of the classroom, she also enjoys working with graphic design as creative director at Bossier Magazine and learning to beekeep with Hoya Hive. As a Fritz Fellow, Joyce is working with the Ethics Lab and the Communication, Culture, and Technology Department to better understand the ways in which existing systems of surveillance and cyberlaw policies uphold norms of control. Additionally, she and the team are utilizing design justice principles to think of ways of shifting these harmful systems.

Adam Ginsburg

Undergraduate Fritz Family Fellow

Adam is a Georgetown University senior studying government and statistics. A passionate believer in the positive power of politics, he works for FairVote, spent his 2019 summer in Iowa as an organizing fellow for Elizabeth Warren’s presidential campaign, and is the research director, editor, and co-host of the Fly on the Wall­­ podcast (GU Politics’ entirely student-run podcast). In his free time, you can find Adam debating the specifics of policy with his friends or fruitlessly cheering on his beloved New York Knicks.

As a Fritz Fellow, Adam works with The Massive Data Institute (MDI), GU Politics, and The Computer Science Department to analyze social and digital media related to the 2020 presidential campaign. The purpose of this work is to enrich the public dialogue about the campaign and to develop analytics that will be useful to scholars producing peer-reviewed research on election outcomes.

Obinna (Obi) Iloani

Law Fritz Family Fellow

Obi is a first-year law student at Georgetown. He was born and raised in Houston, Texas, and graduated cum laude from Texas Tech University in Lubbock. While pursuing his undergraduate degree in Political Science, he had the opportunity to intern on Capitol Hill. There he worked directly with Congressman Gene Green’s Communications Director where he developed an interest in technology policy. After graduating, Obi worked at CS Disco, a legal technology start-up, and then as a litigation paralegal in his hometown, before deciding to apply to The Georgetown University Law Center and the Tech Scholars Program. Obi is spending the summer conducting independent research concerning the applications of facial recognition software and its use on public transportation.

Romina Montellano Morales

Law Fritz Family Fellow

Romina grew up in Austin, Texas. In 2018 she graduated from the University of Texas with a B.A. in Sociology and Humanities. Romina is currently a rising 3L at the Georgetown University Law Center. Her hobbies include cooking, ballet, and caring for her plants. Romina is spending her summer working with The Center on Privacy and Technology and The Institute for Technology Law and Policy to conduct research and analysis regarding the use of surveillance and data-sharing in immigration enforcement.